Brawn Media Blog

Why Googling Your Business is a Bad Practice!

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So your company has just started its first PPC campaign. You or your agency has done keyword research, created some killer ads and your landing page is on fleek (THAT you can Google!). Now that it’s live, you want to see it in action, right?

Your first instinct may be to Google your keywords, see those ads above your competitors and maybe even click one to test it. But if you have taken the time to create your campaigns or hired an agency to do so, you should also understand that this is the last thing you ought to do. Google may answer most of life’s questions, but it isn’t your best friend!

How does Googling your business negatively affect your campaigns and is there a way around it, you ask? Well, let me help answer those questions.

1. Data. By Googling your business, you are creating false data that AdWords will take into consideration and can then skew the numbers that both AdWords and a PPC manager uses to improve your account. When you Google one of your keywords and your ad is served, you have now added an impression.

Since the Click through Rate (CTR) takes impressions into consideration, you have now changed your CTR. Say you have 5 clicks and 1,000 impressions. Your CTR would be 0.05%. If you sit there and Google all your keywords to see if your ads appear, your CTR will continue to change.

Google can push ads that see better performance, such as CTRs and Cost per Clicks (CPCs). Changing this data can alter the way Google’s algorithm works and can change how your account manager looks at the performance of each keyword and ad.

So if your entire company is sitting around Googling all your keywords, this could really be hurting the optimization of your campaigns.

2. Google Remembers You. In a sense, Google is just like Sarah McLachlan (hear me out on this one).

If you sit at your computer or on your phone and continue to Google the same keywords or a variation of your keywords waiting for those ads to appear, you may notice that ads can change or even begin to disappear.

Especially if you are signed in to your Google account, your search behavior is being tracked and Google knows if you are finding what you want in the ads it’s serving. If it notices you are unlikely to click a specific ad (or ads in general) while you keep searching similar keywords, you may see your ad one day and then not see it again for a while after.

Google wants to make money too, so they are looking for users who will click an ad!

3. AdWords Works on a Schedule. Even if you can pay top dollar for every single keyword you bid on and your Quality Score is through the roof, it’s likely you won’t hit 100% search impression share.

Search impression share, as Google puts it, is “the impressions you’ve received on the Search Network divided by the estimated number of impressions you were eligible to receive.”

You are presumably advertising in a decent sized area with a well put together keyword list and have set up your ads to show evenly throughout the day as AdWords suggests. If this is the case, your ad delivery will be optimized to spend your daily budget fairly evenly. That being said, AdWords will not serve your ads EVERY TIME someone searches your keywords.

Tip: Check what your search impression share lost to rank and budget are to see where specifically you are losing additional impressions.

4. Stealing Your Own Impressions. Going off points 2 and 3, if you keep Googling your business and your search impression share isn’t 100%, you are stealing impressions from potential customers!

Say you own a Jeep dealership. At 12:24 you Google one of your keywords and your ad appears in the number one spot. You examine your ad further and all the extensions you could ask for are there, and your clickable call to action appears. Everything seems to be in check, right?

At the same time, someone in-market who has done their research and is ready to buy searches for a “2016 Jeep Wrangler”; this time around your competitor’s ad appears. The user then clicks on their ad instead, finds the same car you have on your lot, and they contact that dealer to come in and look at it.

A great thing about search advertising is that you are serving ads to only people who are looking for what you have to offer. One thing you cannot control is targeting people who will 100% click your ad and convert every time. Leave your impressions for the customers.

Since Google doesn’t get paid unless someone clicks an ad, they probably don’t want you searching for your ads and not clicking them either. So if you are eager to see if this whole PPC thing is working the day after it is set live, take a deep breath and fight the urge to Google your business. Like most good things, these campaigns take time. If you or your agency optimizes campaigns well, CTRs, CPCs, search impression share and more will all improve and will allow for your ads to show more often to potential customers.

In the meantime, Google has an Ad Preview and Diagnosis tool that lets you mimic the searches you would do through your browser. This will not add data to your campaign, and it allows you to preview ads in specific locations and on different devices.

Need help with your PPC campaign? Contact the professionals at Brawn Media to discuss a plan that will meet the needs of your business. Contact us online or call 518-472-0060.

 


Written by Dylan Youngs, Digital Media Supervisor at Brawn Media. Learn more about him and the rest of our team here. Connect with Dylan on LinkedIn.


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